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Official News From the Office of Communications

Tennessee College for Women Celebrates 50th Reunion

TCW1.jpgBelmont’s Office of Alumni Relations partners with TCW Alumnae Association to host event Saturday in Murfreesboro
Belmont University will partner this weekend with the Tennessee College for Women Alumnae Association to host the group’s 50th Reunion. The event will be held this Saturday, Sept. 25, at the First Baptist Church in Murfreesboro, beginning with the group’s annual business meeting and concluding with a luncheon. Belmont’s Office of Alumni Relations partners with the TCW Alumnae Association to host this reunion year after year, as the alumnae have helped many Belmont students through substantial scholarship contributions. Currently, 11 Belmont students receive TCW scholarship funds.
Mary Rogers Mims, TCW Alumnae Association president and 1946 graduate of TCW, said, “In its 40 years of existence, TCW survived two tragic wars and the Great Depression and still managed to give young women a first-class Christian education. Despite the school’s short span of time, the influence of this special place is still felt in homes, churches and communities throughout our world. The influence has been continued in our children and our children’s children. We cherish the memories of our days at TCW, and those of us who remain pray to find strength to continue in God’s service. We are grateful to be able to continue our legacy of Christian education through the students at Belmont University and are grateful for their support and recognition throughout the years.”
Debbie Coppinger, Belmont’s senior director of alumni relation, added, “Hosting the annual reunion for the Tennessee College for Women alumnae has been one of the most rewarding projects the Office of Alumni Relations has taken on. The ladies have a lasting legacy of Christian education and fellowship and their infectious spirits are such a joy. The scholarships they provide to Belmont students allow them to impact so many lives, and we are simply honored to be able to recognize them annually in such a special way.”
On Sept. 11, 1907, Tennessee College for Women opened its doors to 90 students, and thus began its tradition of offering the very best educational opportunities for young women. For nearly four decades, young women were educated in both mind and spirit and trained under positive Christian influence.