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Belmont University to Host Asian Studies Symposium February 13 – 17

The seventh annual Asian Studies Symposium, sponsored by Belmont University’s Asian Studies program, will be held on campus February 13-17 in the Janet Ayers Academic Center. This year’s theme, Representations of Buddhism, will highlight divergent facets of Buddhism’s representation through art, literature, popular culture, social activism and personal journey.

The symposium is intentionally constructed to support the exhibition Secrets of Buddhist Art: Tibet, Japan, and Korea opening in the Ingram Gallery of the Frist Center for Visual Arts on February 10. The exhibition is on loan from the Newark Museum Arts of Asia collection, and the curator of those materials, Dr. Katherine Paul, will open the Belmont Asian Studies Symposium on Monday, February 13 at 10 a.m. on the topic “Living Hells and Heavens: the Art of Buddhist Rebirths.”

This year’s events also include an emphasis on the myriad forms Buddhism has taken in Asia and the world, bringing experts on Asia in fields of business, art, religion, philosophy and society to campus.  A special panel composed of regional practitioners will also share their personal journeys in the Buddhist way.

Speakers will include Dr. Paul Lavy, Southeast and South Asian Art History, University of Hawai’i at Manoa; Dr. Cathy Benton, Chair, Department of Religion, Lake Forest College; Dr. William Gorvine, Chair, Religious Studies, Hendrix College; Dr. Todd Munson, Director of Asian Studies, Randolph-Macon College; Dr. Qingjun Li, Asian Studies, Belmont University; Dr. Kimiyo Murata-Soraci, Asian Studies, Belmont University; Dr. Marty Bell, Religion, Belmont University; Dr. Andrew Davis, Philosophy, Belmont University; Dr. Cynthia Bisson, East Asian History, Belmont University.

The full schedule for the symposium and its convocation credit events on campus can be found here.

The full schedule for the exhibition Secrets of Buddhist Art: Tibet, Japan, and Korea opening in the Ingram Gallery of the Frist Center for Visual Arts, including construction of a sand mandala by monks from Drepung Loseling Monastery, can be found here.

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